Insula of Vicus Caprarius - Underground Rome

Insula of Vicus Caprarius - Underground Rome
Tours & Sightseeing > Underground Tours > Underground Tours
$117.65
Duration: 60 minutes
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Description

The term “City of Water” currently used to define the archaeological site of the Vicus Caprarius, is used because of the presence of the element that characterizes the site: first the water that flows from the Trevi Fountain, the monumental baroque fountain powered by ‘aqueduct virgin in whose immediate vicinity lies the archaeological site.
Excavations have revealed two buildings, contiguous and contemporary, lined up on the west side, along the Vicus Caprarius or Capralicus.
The north building has been identified as a housing complex, while the south building, which is also well preserved in elevation, has been destined for public use.

  • This is an exclusive visit, so the site will open only for you.
  • This tour includes a private guide at disposition and entrance tickets with reservation.
  • The meeting point with your guide will be at the entrance of the site.
  • Your guide will wait for you with personalized signboard.
Your private guide will let you immerse in the history of the archaeological site. Extraordinarily the site is currently available in its entirety, thanks to an overhead tour route; it has also been set up a museum in which are displayed the finds.

You will discover this and more other things during this tour!                                                                                                                                                                                                                                          .

The term “City of Water” currently used to define the archaeological site of the Vicus Caprarius, is used because of the presence of the element that characterizes the site: first the water that flows from the Trevi Fountain, the monumental baroque fountain powered by ‘aqueduct virgin in whose immediate vicinity lies the archaeological site.
Excavations have revealed two buildings, contiguous and contemporary, lined up on the west side, along the Vicus Caprarius or Capralicus.
The north building has been identified as a housing complex, while the south building, which is also well preserved in elevation, has been destined for public use.